King County GIS Center
King Street Center
201 S. Jackson St.
Suite 706
Seattle, WA 98104
giscenter@kingcounty.gov

+ 47.59909 N
- 122.33136 W

+ 47°  35' 56.72"
- 122° 19' 52.90"

 

Sensitive Area Ordinance Streams

Description | Contacts | Attribute Information | Constraints

Data layer thumbnail image

Description

Layer name: SAOSTREAM
Subject category: enviro
Title: Sensitive Area Ordinance Streams
Feature Count: 0
Feature Type: Line
Abstract: Streams are defined in the Sensitive Areas Ordinance (SAO) as those areas of King County where surface waters produce a defined channel or bed. A defined channel or bed is an area that demonstrates clear evidence of the passage of water and includes but is not limited to bedrock channels, gravel beds, sand and silt beds and defined-channel swales. The channel or bed need not contain water year-round. This definition is not meant to include irrigation ditches, canals, storm or surface water runoff devices or other entirely artificial watercourses unless they are used by salmonids or used to convey streams naturally occurring prior to construction in such watercourse.
Purpose: To provide guidelines for development.
Status: Complete
Updated: None planned
Time period of content: (single date,as YYYYMMDD):: 20021017
Time period of content: (date range, as YYYYMMDD):: -
Spatial reference: WA State Plane North
FGDC Documentation: Classic or FAQ
Open Data Availability: Not Available
Place Keywords: Washington state, King County, WA, Pacific NW,
Theme Keywords: streams, enviro, inlandWaters,
Lineage: Available
Supplemental Information: King County classifies streams into the following categories: Class 1 streams are those inventoried as "Shorelines of the State" under King County's Shoreline Master Program. Class 2 streams are those smaller that Class 1 streams that flow year-round during years of normal rainfall or those that are used by salmonids. Class 3 streams are those that are intermittent or ephemeral during years of normal rainfall and are not used by salmonids. Unclassified streams are those for which a water course has been identified but for which the defining characteristics of a Class 1, 2, or 3 stream have not been determined. Further study is necessary to classify these streams. The overall policy objective for strem management in King County is no net loss of stream functions and values. A detailed description of development standards for streams is given in the Sensitive Areas Ordinance and administrative rules. For exceptions, exemptions, and mitigation procedures for streams, please refer to the SAO and administrative rules. In general, the minimum required native vegetation buffer width for each stream class as measured from the ordinary high water mark is a follows: Class 1 Streams - 100-foot buffer Class 2 Streams used by salmonids - 50-foot buffer. A study may be required to determine salmonid use. Class 3 Streams - 25-foot buffer

Contacts

Maintained by:
King County GIS Center
Primary: Paul McCombs, Permitting GIS Program Manager, 206-263-7258
(How to e-mail a County contact)
Secondary: KCGIS Center; giscenter@kingcounty.gov. This mailbox is monitored during business hours.

Attribute Information

ItemDescriptionDomain
_CLASS__classifications of streams
1Shorelines of the State
2SSmaller than Class 1 streams that flow year-round during years of normal rainfall or those that are used by salmonids. S = Salmon present
2PSmaller than Class 1 streams that flow year-round during years of normal rainfall or those that are used by salmonids. P = Perennial stream but no salmon.
3Intermittent or ephemeral during years of normal rainfall and are not used by salmonids.
UnclassifiedA water course has been identified but for which the defining characteristics of a Class 1, 2, 3 stream have not been determined. Further study is necessary to classify these streams.
_EDIT_DATE_edit date
_SOURCE1_source


Constraints

Access: None

Use: King County data are made available with the understanding that they shall be used exclusively by the obtainer or his/her authorized agents. Digital products may not be reproduced or redistributed in any form or by any means without the express written authorization of King County. Because of seasonal variations in streamflow, the map folio does not represent a conclusive statement on stream classes. The majority of area have been field checked only once at a specific time of year. Weather conditions and stream flow affect the ability of field workers to locate fish. Research was also limited by environmental factors such as steep slopes and heavily vegetated areas that prevented access, and by restricted access to private property. This set of maps represents a compilation of the most thorough research on the location of and presence of salmonids in streams in King County as of 1990; however, some streams are not shown on these maps and many streams require further study to determine a final classification. Studies that are incomplete at this time, but will add to this information base, are the Washington Rivers Information System, on a Geographic Information System, managed by Washington Department of Wildlife and funded by Bonneville Power Administration; and a detailed survey of Newaukum Creek by Trout Unlimited.