King County GIS Center
King Street Center
201 S. Jackson St.
Suite 706
Seattle, WA 98104
giscenter@kingcounty.gov

+ 47.59909 N
- 122.33136 W

+ 47°  35' 56.72"
- 122° 19' 52.90"

 

Soil with Capability Class and Hydrologic Group

Description | Contacts | Attribute Information | Constraints

Data layer thumbnail image

Description

Layer name: SOIL_CAPABILITY
Subject category: enviro
Title: Soil with Capability Class and Hydrologic Group
Feature Count: 14380
Feature Type: Polygon
Abstract: Based on NRCS SSURGO data with attributes to inform agricultural viability (capablity class and farm class/Prime and Important Soils) and hydrologic condition.
Purpose: For determining soil capabilty for agriculture as well hydrologic group.
Status: Complete
Updated: As needed
Time period of content: (single date,as YYYYMMDD):: 20180628
Time period of content: (date range, as YYYYMMDD):: -
Spatial reference: WA State Plane North
FGDC Documentation: Classic or FAQ
Open Data Availability: Not Available
Place Keywords: Pacific NW, King County, WA, Washington state,
Theme Keywords: enviro, soil, agriculture, hydrology, farming, environment,
Lineage: Not available
Supplemental Information: Based on USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Survey Geographic data (SSURGO data with attributes to inform agricultural viability (capablity class and farm class/Prime and Important Soils) and hydrologic condition.

Contacts

Maintained by:
King County IT, GIS Center
Primary: Todd Klinka, GIS Analyst, 206-477-4412
(How to e-mail a County contact)
Secondary: KCGIS Center; giscenter@kingcounty.gov. This mailbox is monitored during business hours.

Attribute Information

ItemDescriptionDomain
_musym_The symbol used to uniquely identify the soil mapunit in the soil survey.For western King County a 2 or 3 letter code for soil type, for eastern King County a 2 or 3 digit code for soil type.
_mukey_A non-connotative string of characters used to uniquely identify a record in the Mapunit table.Series of unique numbers for each soil type.
_muname_Longer description of soil type including series and slope.Series of descriptive names
_mukind_Kind of mapunit. Example: consociation.List of kinds of mapunits.
_capclass_Land capability classification shows, in a general way, the suitability of soils for most kinds of field crops. Crops that require special management are excluded. The soils are grouped according to their limitations for field crops, the risk of damage if they are used for crops, and the way they respond to management. The criteria used in grouping the soils do not include major and generally expensive landforming that would change slope, depth, or other characteristics of the soils, nor do they include possible but unlikely major reclamation projects. Capability classification is not a substitute for interpretations designed to show suitability and limitations of groups of soils for rangeland, for forestland, or for engineering purposes. In the capability system, soils are generally grouped at three levels—capability class, subclass, and unit.
0Not Classified
2Class 2 soils have moderate limitations that restrict the choice of plants or that require moderate conservation practices.
3Class 3 soils have severe limitations that restrict the choice of plants or that require special conservation practices, or both.
4Class 4 soils have very severe limitations that restrict the choice of plants or that require very careful management, or both.
5Class 5 soils are subject to little or no erosion but have other limitations, impractical to remove, that restrict their use mainly to pasture, rangeland, forestland, or wildlife habitat.
6Class 6 soils have severe limitations that make them generally unsuitable for cultivation and that restrict their use mainly to pasture, rangeland, forestland, or wildlife habitat.
7Class 7 soils have very severe limitations that make them unsuitable for cultivation and that restrict their use mainly to grazing, forestland, or wildlife habitat.
8Class 8 soils and miscellaneous areas have limitations that preclude commercial plant production and that restrict their use to recreational purposes, wildlife habitat, watershed, or esthetic purposes.
_kwfact_An erodibility factor which quantifies the susceptibility of soil particles to detachment and movement by water. This factor is adjusted for the effect of rock fragments
Range Min:0
Range Max:0.49
_cokey_A non-connotative string of characters used to uniquely identify a record in the Component table.Series of unique numbers
_Hydric_A yes/no field that indicates whether or not a map unit component is classified as a "hydric soil". If rated as hydric, the specific criteria met are listed in the Component Hydric Criteria table available from NRCS.
NoNo
YesYes
_FarmClass_Prime and other Important Farmlands. Important farmlands consist of prime farmland, unique farmland, and farmland of statewide or local importance.
All areas are prime farmlandPrime farmland, as defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is land that has the best combination of physical and chemical characteristics for producing food, feed, forage, fiber, and oilseed crops and is available for these uses. It could be cultivated land, pastureland, forestland, or other land, but it is not urban or built-up land or water areas. The soil quality, growing season, and moisture supply are those needed for the soil to economically produce sustained high yields of crops when proper management, including water management, and acceptable farming methods are applied. In general, prime farmland has an adequate and dependable supply of moisture from precipitation or irrigation, a favorable temperature and growing season, acceptable acidity or alkalinity, an acceptable salt and sodium content, and few or no rocks. The water supply is dependable and of adequate quality. Prime farmland is permeable to water and air. It is not excessively erodible or saturated with water for long periods, and it either is not frequently flooded during the growing season or is protected from flooding. Slope ranges mainly from 0 to 6 percent. More detailed information about the criteria for prime farmland is available at the local office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Farmland of statewide importanceFarmland of statewide importance
Not identifiedNot identified
Not prime farmlandNot prime farmland
Prime farmland if drainedPrime farmland if drained
Prime farmland if irrigatedPrime farmland if irrigated
Prime if drained AND flood prot or not freq fldPrime farmland if drained and either protected rom flooding or not frequently flooded during the growing season
Prime if irr and protect from flood or not freq fldPrime farmland if irrigated and either protected rom flooding or not frequently flooded during the growing season
_HYDGRPDCD_Hydrologic soil groups are based on estimates of runoff potential. Soils are assigned to one of four groups according to the rate of water infiltration when the soils are not protected by vegetation, are thoroughly wet, and receive precipitation from long-duration storms. The soils in the United States are assigned to four groups (A, B, C, and D) and three dual classes (A/D, B/D, and C/D). The groups are defined as follows:
AGroup A. Soils having a high infiltration rate (low runoff potential) when thoroughly wet. These consist mainly of deep, well drained to excessively drained sands or gravelly sands. These soils have a high rate of water transmission.
BGroup B. Soils having a moderate infiltration rate when thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of moderately deep or deep, moderately well drained or well drained soils that have moderately fine texture to moderately coarse texture. These soils have a moderate rate of water transmission.
CGroup C. Soils having a slow infiltration rate when thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of soils having a layer that impedes the downward movement of water or soils of moderately fine texture or fine texture. These soils have a slow rate of water transmission.
DGroup D. Soils having a very slow infiltration rate (high runoff potential) when thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of clays that have a high shrink-swell potential, soils that have a high water table, soils that have a claypan or clay layer at or near the surface, and soils that are shallow over nearly impervious material. These soils have a very slow rate of water transmission.


Constraints

Access: Access Constraint: Data is not available on GIS Data Portal, it may be available via a custom data request

Use: Use Constraint: King County data are made available with the understanding that they shall be used exclusively by the obtainer or his/her authorized agents. Digital products may not be reproduced or redistributed in any form or by any means without the express written authorization of King County.